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FFIAF/C942 Revision 3 (En) Authored by Simon Funge Smith and published by FAO (2018),

The FAO Fishery and Aquaculture Circular C942 Revision 3 (C942 Rev. 3) updates and expands the scope of previous revisions of the circular and is an important baseline document, intended to assist in the global understanding of inland fisheries and inform dialogue on their current and future role.

The third revision reviews the status and trends of inland fisheries catch at global, continental and subcontinental levels. It places inland capture fisheries in the context of overall global fish production, and calls attention to the importance of inland capture fisheries with respect to food security and nutrition and the Sustainable Development Goals. It quantifies global inland fisheries resources in terms of food production, nutrition, employment, economic contribution with respect to those countries/regions or subnational areas where they are important.

A characterization approach to distinguish large-scale and small-scale fishing operations and their relative contributions is provided. The review provides estimated economic values of inland fisheries, as well as a valuation of potential replacement cost of these (in terms of dollars, other resources such as land and water, feeds). There is also an analysis of the extent and economic value of recreational inland fisheries. The contribution to employment and the gender differences related to this are quantified. The linkages between inland fisheries and biodiversity are also explored.

C942 Rev. 3 discusses ways to measure and assess inland fisheries, in particular, how to establish more accurately inland fishery catches in the many situations where there are challenges to collection of catch statistics.

Common oceans are marine Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction (ABNJ) that are not governed by any single nation. Instead, all nations are jointly responsible for sustainably managing those areas. ABNJ, also known as common oceans, include the high seas and the seabed’s beyond the extended continental shelf of coastal states - areas which are difficult to monitor, challenging to manage and easy to over-exploit.

Unfortunately, common oceans face a variety of threats including illegal fishing, pollution and unsustainable fishing and shipping practices. These activities are damaging diverse and valuable ecosystems that provide important ecosystem services, essential food and vital livelihoods for people around the world. Millions of families in both developed and developing countries depend on income generated from fishing and its associated activities. 150 000 MT of deep-sea species of fish are caught every year, and up to 50 different deep-sea species are caught in common oceans alone.

Building on the need to achieve sustainable management of fisheries and biodiversity conservation in common oceans, FAO developed the Common Oceans ABNJ Programme with support from the Global Environment Facility (GEF). The Programme, comprised of four individual projects, is an innovative, unique and comprehensive initiative working in close collaboration with two other GEF agencies, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Bank. Focusing on tuna and deep-sea fisheries, the four projects bring together some 65 partners including governments, regional management bodies, civil society, the private sector, academia and industry to work towards ensuring the sustainable use and conservation of ABNJ biodiversity and ecosystem services.

Source: FAO, 2 July 2018

APEC economies committed to the ocean- IUU Fishing

Published in Feature News
Tuesday, 13 November 2018 03:46

In June, experts and decision makers from around the world gathered at the United Nations Headquarters in New York to focus on the commitment made by nations in 2015 to protect the health of the ocean.

Voluntary agreements have been pledged across the spectrum, from industries to NGOs, in support of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 14 “Life Below Water”.
The Global Oceans Program (GOP) of The Nature Conservancy (TNC) representative, said Illegal 

Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) fishing is diverting the commitment to reach the SDG 14 by 2020. In her presentation on IUU to the APEC Oceans and Fisheries Working Group (OFWG) said to reach the SDG 14, a combined effort is required by all groups and agencies involved in the monitoring, control and surveillance (MCS) of its oceans.

She further said that TNC is working in unison with respective authorities and international bodies at the national, regional and global to help combat IUU fishing.

In the Pacific Islands, IUU fishing has cost US$660 million annually in loss of revenue from ocean resources.


Source: APEC, 7 August, 2018

Argentina and Spain have signed a fisheries and aquaculture bilateral cooperation Memorandum of Understanding. The MoU was stamped in Buenos Aires during the recent G20 Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries ministerial meeting by Argentina's Luis Miguel Etchevehere and Spain's Luis Planas.

The MoU establishes a framework of cooperation to reinforce the bases for an improved maritime sector potential exploitation and ensure conservation and a sustainable management of straddling species.

It will also coordinate efforts to combat illegal, undeclared, unreported fishing and collaboration in scientific research in the area adjacent to Argentina's Exclusive Economic Zone. Cooperation will also be extensive to technological exchange on production and marketing, with training and formation programs.

The two countries will exchange information on fisheries, scientific knowledge in fisheries research and related activities. Argentina and Spain will share information and technology in the fields of catches, aquaculture breeding, transformation, distribution and related activities, are some of the outstanding points of the MoU.

Source: MercoPress, 1 August 2018

Untouched ocean habitats shrinking rapidly, study says

Published in Feature News
Tuesday, 13 November 2018 03:44

Shipping, pollution and overfishing have reduced areas of “wilderness” to just 13 % of the world’s oceans, a study, warning that untouched marine habitats could completely vanish within half a century. International researchers analyzing the impact of human activity on underwater ecosystems — from fertilizer runoff to increased sea transport — have mapped the dwindling zones considered pristine.

The bulk of remaining ocean wilderness, classed as “mostly free of human disturbance,” was found in the Arctic and Antarctic, and around remote Pacific islands.

Just 5 % of the wilderness areas are in protected zones, leaving the rest vulnerable, according to the study published in the journal Current Biology. It called for greater international coordination to regulate the world’s oceans, clamp down on overfishing, limit destructive ocean-mining and reduce sediment runoff.

Last year, the United Nations began negotiating its first conservation treaty for the high seas, which would be a legally binding act governing the sustainable use of oceans outside national maritime boundaries.

Source: AFP, 27 July 2018

CGGI Ghost Gear Reporter App

Published in Responsible Fisheries
Tuesday, 13 November 2018 03:40

The Global Ghost Gear Initiative (CGGI) has developed a Ghost Gear Reporter app on the Google Play and Apple and Apple App stores worldwide. CGGI encourages the use of the app in any ghost gear related work, beach clean ups, etc. It’s simple, intuitive and easy to use and all data gets fed into the CGGI global data portal, helping to establish a global baseline of data on ghost gear around the world. The app allows for as much or as little data as you have to be uploaded, as well as photographs and geo-locations of the gear via mobile devices.

Fishers are also encouraged to use the app and report when they either lose gear themselves or find previously lost gear while out fishing. Data collected from the app will be used to build evidence of ghost gear around the world and will help to inform ongoing solutions work in the future.

INFOFISH International 5/2018

Ecuador and Peru launched the Coastal Fisheries Initiative - Latin America (CFI) in Manta, which includes integrated actions for the management and use of coastal fisheries in an inclusive manner, in artisanal and small-scale fisheries scale. The initiative was structured by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) and the non-governmental organization Conservation International (CI).

The two organizations signed the respective agreements for the technical and financial implementation of the project, which is valid for 48 months and aims to demonstrate holistic, ecosystem-based management to improve the governance of coastal fisheries in the Southeast Pacific.

In order to consolidate the project in both countries, it will be necessary to implement the following strategies: creation of practice communities with fishers, stakeholders and authorities of both countries, implementation of specific practical tests for seven fisheries and two sites, registration and exchange of experience and lessons learned, between both countries and between IPC participants and the implementation of lessons to improve the existing schemes of fisheries governance or to implement new ones.

The Coastal Fisheries Initiative is an association of six organizations that has been developed and funded within the framework of the GEF to safeguard the world's oceans and the marine environment.

Source: FIS, 28 July 2018

An international ocean conservation and advocacy organization has called on the government to issue guidelines to protect the country’s major fishing grounds, to curb overfishing and illegal fishing activities in municipal waters and ensure the livelihood of small fishers. “The policy, as among those provided for under the amended Fisheries Code, pertains to the designation of Fisheries Management Areas, or FMAs, in the country. It is envisioned that a comprehensive science-based fisheries management plan will be enforced on these areas to ensure sustained productivity and protect them from overfishing, illegal fishing, and destructive fishing practices that destroy critical marine habitats,” said environment lawyer and vice president of Oceana Philippines. She added that the designation of FMAs is needed to rebuild and restore the abundance of the country’s fishing grounds, two-thirds of which are considered "overfished."

The Department of the Interior and Local Government recently issued a memorandum circular for coastal local government units to regulate and monitor fishery activities in their municipal waters. It likewise rolled out nationwide a scorecard for local government units (LGUs) to fill up, as a self-validating transparency and monitoring tool in assessing its compliance with the amended Fisheries Code.


Source: Philippines News Agency, 27 September 2018

Untouched ocean habitats shrinking rapidly, study says

Published in Research
Tuesday, 13 November 2018 03:06

Shipping, pollution and overfishing have reduced areas of “wilderness” to just 13 % of the world’s oceans, a study, warning that untouched marine habitats could completely vanish within half a century. International researchers analyzing the impact of human activity on underwater ecosystems — from fertilizer runoff to increased sea transport — have mapped the dwindling zones considered pristine.

The bulk of remaining ocean wilderness, classed as “mostly free of human disturbance,” was found in the Arctic and Antarctic, and around remote Pacific islands.

Just 5 % of the wilderness areas are in protected zones, leaving the rest vulnerable, according to the study published in the journal Current Biology. It called for greater international coordination to regulate the world’s oceans, clamp down on overfishing, limit destructive ocean-mining and reduce sediment runoff.

Last year, the United Nations began negotiating its first conservation treaty for the high seas, which would be a legally binding act governing the sustainable use of oceans outside national maritime boundaries.

Source: AFP, 27 July 2018

Argentina and Spain have signed a fisheries and aquaculture bilateral cooperation Memorandum of Understanding. The MoU was stamped in Buenos Aires during the recent G20 Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries ministerial meeting by Argentina's Luis Miguel Etchevehere and Spain's Luis Planas.

The MoU establishes a framework of cooperation to reinforce the bases for an improved maritime sector potential exploitation and ensure conservation and a sustainable management of straddling species.

It will also coordinate efforts to combat illegal, undeclared, unreported fishing and collaboration in scientific research in the area adjacent to Argentina's Exclusive Economic Zone. Cooperation will also be extensive to technological exchange on production and marketing, with training and formation programs.

The two countries will exchange information on fisheries, scientific knowledge in fisheries research and related activities. Argentina and Spain will share information and technology in the fields of catches, aquaculture breeding, transformation, distribution and related activities, are some of the outstanding points of the MoU.

Source: MercoPress, 1 August 2018

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