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UN Declares War on Ocean Plastic

Published in General
Thursday, 27 April 2017 01:15

 

UN Environment launched an unprecedented global campaign to eliminate major sources of marine litter: microplastics in cosmetics and the excessive, wasteful usage of single-use plastic by the year 2022.Launched at the Economist World Ocean Summit in Bali, the #CleanSeas campaign is urging governments to pass plastic reduction policies; targeting industry to minimize plastic packaging and redesign products;and calling on consumers to change their throwaway habits– before irreversible damage is done to our seas.The #CleanSeas campaign is a global movement targeting governments, industry and consumers to urgently reduce the production and excessive use of plastic that is polluting the earth’s oceans, damaging marine life and threatening human health. Throughout the year, the #CleanSeas campaign will be announcing ambitious measures by countries and businesses to eliminate micro-plastics from personal care products, ban or tax single-use bags, and dramatically reduce other disposable plastic items.

The UN environment body aims to transform all spheres of change–habits, practices, standards and policies around the globe to dramatically reduce marine litter and the harm it causes. So far, ten countries have already joined the campaign with far-reaching pledges to turn the plastic tide: Belgium, Costa Rica, France, Grenada,Indonesia, Norway, Panama, Saint Lucia, Sierra Leone and Uruguay.

Each year, more than 8 million tonnes of plastic ends up in the oceans, wreaking havoc on marine wildlife,fisheries and tourism, and costing at least $8 billion in damage to marine ecosystems. Up to 80 per cent of all litter in our oceans is made of plastic. According to some estimates, at the rate we are dumping items such as plastic bottles, bags and cups after a single use, by 2050 oceans will carry more plastic than fish and an estimated 99 per cent of seabirds will have ingested plastic.

 

Publish at : FI Issue 107

Source: http://web.unep.org

 

 

The Tamil Nadu state government declared that seafood from Ernavur, Kasimedu and Ennore, the places affected by the oil slick since two shops collided on January 28, is fit for human consumption. The report released by the Government says that the abnormal smell of petroleum was not present in the samples of fin fish, crustaceans (prawns, crabs, lobsters,shrimps and crayfish) and mollusks (squids, scallops,snails and oysters). While the concentration of some petroleum pollutants was below detectable levels, the oil and grease values at some polluted spots were within the prescribed limit for harbor water, it added.

Publish at : FTD Issue 97

Source: Times of India

 

Norway will contribute $ 4.8 million to United Nation’s efforts to combat IUU and other fishing crimes in developing countries. The Norwegian government has signed a four year deal spanning during 2017- 2020with the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime(UNODC) to combat transnational organized crimes in fisheries in developing countries. The agreement is part of the Fish and Development Programme launched by Norway’s foreign ministry last year, which includes several types of measures against fisheries crimes. UNODC will assist with updating legislation and with police, customs and the courts.

Publish at : FTD Issue 97

Source: Intrafish

Ghana: Ban on fishing to save dwindling stock

Published in National News
Friday, 21 April 2017 02:03

 

The Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture Development and the Fisheries Commission in Ghana have placed a ban on fishing in the country.The two month long ban was imposed to protect the fish and ensure more breeding to replenish declining stocks. About ten percent of the Ghana's population relies on fish and government has adopted the ban as a protective measure against a foreseen shortage offish. Despite the growing opposition against the ban from various stake holders, the Fisheries authorities believe its directive will in the long run help improve the fortunes of Ghana's fishing industry.

Publish at : FTD Issue 97

Source: DW.com

Argentina: Shrimp survey completed

Published in National News
Friday, 21 April 2017 02:00

 

The 15 day survey of shrimp (Pleoticus muelleri), was conducted by 8 researchers of INIDEP and 2 officials from the province of Chubut in the Gulf of San Jorge and the coast of Chubut. The survey was conducted with the help of the commercial vessel Bogavante Segundo.In 15 days of work, the researchers and the crew of the vessel were able to verify the presence of concentrations of accessible and vulnerable shrimp to the commercial tangonera network in the areas between latitude 43 °00'S and 45 ° 00'S, west of 064 ° 00'W; And between latitude 45 ° 00'S and 47 ° 10'S, west of 065 ° 00'W.

Publish at : FTD Issue 97

Source: http://info.inidep.edu.ar

 

A new regulation published in Chile’s official gazette requires industrial and artisanal fishing vessels of15 meters or more in length to use image recording devices to detect and probe discarding and by-catch activities. This requirement has been introduced with the intention to open the possibility for Chilean fishery products to enter the increasingly demanding global markets in matters of sustainability, in which European markets stand out for the total ban on the discard of species regulated with catch quotas. Industrial ships will have six months, from the publication of the regulation, to comply with the mandatory cameras,while artisanal vessels will have a term of three years.The devices must be activated at the time of departure and deactivated at the end of the landing, and must be approved and certified by Sernapesca. The vessels that have not implemented the regulation or that alter the information are exposed to a fine of 20 to 300 monthly tax units (UTM), and the master of ship to a sanction of 3 to 30 UTM.

Publish at : FTD Issue 97

Source: fis.com

 

The Ministry of Production (PRODUCE) has decided to invest in technology to strengthen the fight against illegal and trawling fishing within the first five miles of the Peruvian sea, through the use of drones and monitors. Use of drones will allow to make an accurate evaluation of what is happening in the Peruvian sea for the corresponding actions. The Ministry is also considering acquisition of vessels to strengthen supervision tasks, especially to prevent foreign ships from invading Peruvian territory. These actions will be implemented in coordination with the Peruvian Navy, as of the second half of this year in the north of the country.

Publish at : FTD Issue 97

Source: Produce

 

The officials from Australian Fisheries Management Authority’s (AFMA) along with the trainers from Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA) and New Zealand delivered training to aspiring fisheries officer sin Fiji. This was part of the AFMA’s ongoing work with the Pacific counterparts to build capacity in good practice global fisheries management. A wide range of fisheries topics were covered, including occupational health and safety; social accountability in monitoring,control and surveillance (MCS) activities; roles and responsibilities within MCS; and risk management processes. The officers also facilitated a practical activity involving boarding and inspecting fishing vessels. Eight students hailing from Tonga, Papua New Guinea, Fiji and the Solomon Islands participated in the accredited course. Upon successful completion,participants received a competency-based Certificate IV in Fisheries Enforcement and Compliance from the University of the South Pacific.

Publish at : FTD Issue 97

Source: AFMA

 

The report on the study for the European Commission compiles data and information on fisheries subsidies within six of the world's major fishing countries:Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, China, Russia and the United States. The purpose of the study is to collate and standardise, to the extent possible, information on the value and scope of subsidies to the catching,aquaculture, and marketing and seafood processing sub sectors in six of the major fishing nations beyond the EU - Japan, South Korea, China, the Russian Federation, Taiwan and the United States. This information is intended to provide a current ‘state of play’ regarding key fisheries subsidies in each country.The study finds that subsidies for capture fisheries play a significant role in China, Taiwan, Japan, the US and South Korea, while aquaculture subsidies are the highest in Russia and China. The biggest subsidies go towards research, infrastructure, fuel (China) and insurance (Japan). The European Union is pushing to ban harmful fisheries subsidies that contribute to unsustainable fishing, in line with the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goal 14, which calls on the world to conserve and sustainably use the oceans. The two most damaging types of subsidies are those that increase the fish-catching capacity of fleets and those for fishermen who engage in illegal fishing activities.

 

 

A new method of fishing for Pacific swordfish off the West Coast of USA is proving its value to both fishermen and protected species. The new design by Pfleger Institute of Environmental Research (PIER)uses heavy weights to lower baited hooks to depths of more than 1,000 feet during the day, avoiding unmarketable or federally protected species that reside in shallower waters. The method is showing promise as another way to operate sustainable fisheries that minimize by catch and interactions with protected species, such as marine mammals and sea turtles. Deep-set buoy fishing takes advantage of the fact that different marine species feed at different depths at certain times of the day. Sea turtles, whales,and many fish are most commonly found in warm surface waters known as the upper mixed layer. Other fish, such as swordfish, opah, and big eye thresher sharks, pursue food resources in deeper waters. The deep-set buoy system uses heavy weights to rapidly lower baited hooks to target swordfish between 1,000and 1,500 feet. The buoy gear’s strike detection system alerts fishermen when a fish is on the line and allows for its quick retrieval once hooked. It also preserves the quality and freshness of the catch and allows for the live release of any unwanted catch. The rapid processing of the catch and high quality of the landed product brings a premium price at market. This helps compensate fishermen for the additional time and effort involved in buoy fishing. To assure that buyers are getting what they pay for, PIER has designed a unique tagging program that links the deep-set-buoy-caught fish with the plate of the consumer. A tag one very fish allows consumers to track the fish from vessel to plate. Consumers can use a project webpage on PIER’s website to verify that their product came from one of the deep-set buoy vessels.

 

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INFOFISH is the leading source of marketing support for fish producers and exporters in the Asia-Pacific - a region which includes some of the largest fishing nations in the world.

Its activities include bringing buyers and sellers together, publication of current and long-term marketing information and operation of technical advisory and specialized services.

In addition to organizing exhibitions, conferences, workshops, seminars and training programs, INFOFISH undertakes consultancies on all aspects of fisheries - pre-harvest, harvest and post-harvest.

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