Shrimp enters SIMP with “informed compliance” period

On 31 December 2018, NOAA Fisheries along with Customs and Border Protection officials started an informed compliance period for shrimp importers participating in the Seafood Import Monitoring Program (SIMP). SIMP requires importers keep chain of custody data for products entering the United States. It also requires the shipments to come with harvest and landing data to ensure the products are properly labeled.

SIMP began on 1 January 2018, with such products as Atlantic cod, red snapper, swordfish, and tunas requiring the documentation. Despite being the top imported seafood product, shrimp, at that time, was excluded because similar recordkeeping requirements had not been put in place for US shrimpers and producers. A group of 11 US senators pushed to add shrimp into the program last year by including the provision in the Commerce appropriations bill, that President Trump signed into law as part of an omnibus spending package last March.

Source: INFOFISH Trade News, ITN 2/2019

WSC 2019

The World Seafood Congress (WSC) 2019 cordially invites participants from all over the world to attend the biannual global event which is scheduled to be held on 9-11 September 2019 in Penang, Malaysia. The event is co-organized by Penang Institute and International Association of Fish Inspectors (IAFI).
The conference will be featuring a keynote, oral and poster presentations as well as exhibitions. With the theme “Seafood Supply Chains of the Future”, the conference unites a distinctive and world-class blend of scientists, researchers and leaders both from the scholarly community and industry to trade their information, experiences and research advancements on fish inspection, quality management and technological developments in the seafood sector. It will also address existing and evolving conditions that are critical for the sustainability of fisheries, aquaculture and ocean ecosystems, and demonstrate new innovations and solutions to these challenges.

In addition, there will be travel awards and competitions during the event, which include the following:
Peter Howgate Award will fund the attendance of a young fish technologist (under 30 years old) to the WSC 2019. The Award will cover travel, accommodation and the congress fee, and this will afford the winning applicant a career-changing opportunity to gain insights and build networks in the global fishery sector. You can visit the website for updates and more information (http://www.peterhowgateaward.com/).


IAFI will give a prize for the best WSC posters. The posters will be judged by IAFI board members in the early stage of the conference and the winners will be announced at the start of a plenary session later in the event. Prizes will be given out as First Prize: $500; Second Prize: $300; and Third Prize: $200. For further information about the poster guidelines please visit http://wsc2019.com/registration/abstract_format.
The International Association for Women in Seafood Industry (WSI) launches the second edition of the "Women in Seafood" video competition, with the technical support of MATIS, Iceland and the sponsoring of the French Development Agency (AFD)
and the International Association of Fish Inspectors (IAFI).


The video can be shared in a short film (less than 4 minutes) featuring woman involved in the seafood industry.
For more information, kindly visit this link https:// womeninseafood.com/. The prize is a ticket to attend WSC 2019, the shortlisted finalists’ videos are to be shown in one of the WSC sessions and the winner will be announced. For more information of the event, visit https://wsc2019.com/.

Fisheries management and safeguarding biodiversity beyond national jurisdiction

 

Common oceans are marine Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction (ABNJ) that are not governed by any single nation. Instead, all nations are jointly responsible for sustainably managing those areas. ABNJ, also known as common oceans, include the high seas and the seabed’s beyond the extended continental shelf of coastal states - areas which are difficult to monitor, challenging to manage and easy to over-exploit.

Unfortunately, common oceans face a variety of threats including illegal fishing, pollution and unsustainable fishing and shipping practices. These activities are damaging diverse and valuable ecosystems that provide important ecosystem services, essential food and vital livelihoods for people around the world. Millions of families in both developed and developing countries depend on income generated from fishing and its associated activities. 150 000 MT of deep-sea species of fish are caught every year, and up to 50 different deep-sea species are caught in common oceans alone.

Building on the need to achieve sustainable management of fisheries and biodiversity conservation in common oceans, FAO developed the Common Oceans ABNJ Programme with support from the Global Environment Facility (GEF). The Programme, comprised of four individual projects, is an innovative, unique and comprehensive initiative working in close collaboration with two other GEF agencies, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Bank. Focusing on tuna and deep-sea fisheries, the four projects bring together some 65 partners including governments, regional management bodies, civil society, the private sector, academia and industry to work towards ensuring the sustainable use and conservation of ABNJ biodiversity and ecosystem services.

Source: FAO, 2 July 2018

Pacific bluefins in depleted state?

 

According to the Pew Charitable Trust, the Pacific bluefin tuna population is at just 3.3% of its unfished level, a conclusion that the NGO says confirms the species’ severely depleted status.

Basing its statement on a recently concluded study by the International Scientific Committee for Tuna and Tuna-like Species in the North Pacific Ocean, Pew says that there is continued need for more effective management of the fishery despite countries finally agreeing last year to a rebuilding plan for the species.

The study found that most of the recent catch has been composed of juvenile fish and that despite the heavily depleted status of the stock, the overal catch rose between 2015 and 2016 as four of the five main fishing nations exceeded their quotas. It points out that the estimated number of Pacific bluefin spawned in 2016 was more than double that in 2015 but only slightly above the average over the past 50 years.

Pew calls upon the IATTC and WCPFC to take a science-based approach to ensure that the population is indeed on the road to recovery and must agree on a Pacific-wide harvest strategy that includes precautionary objectives and pre-agreed rules for managing the fishery.

Source: INFOFISH International 4/2018

Untouched ocean habitats shrinking rapidly, study says

Shipping, pollution and overfishing have reduced areas of “wilderness” to just 13 % of the world’s oceans, a study, warning that untouched marine habitats could completely vanish within half a century. International researchers analyzing the impact of human activity on underwater ecosystems — from fertilizer runoff to increased sea transport — have mapped the dwindling zones considered pristine.

The bulk of remaining ocean wilderness, classed as “mostly free of human disturbance,” was found in the Arctic and Antarctic, and around remote Pacific islands.

Just 5 % of the wilderness areas are in protected zones, leaving the rest vulnerable, according to the study published in the journal Current Biology. It called for greater international coordination to regulate the world’s oceans, clamp down on overfishing, limit destructive ocean-mining and reduce sediment runoff.

Last year, the United Nations began negotiating its first conservation treaty for the high seas, which would be a legally binding act governing the sustainable use of oceans outside national maritime boundaries.

Source: AFP, 27 July 2018

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About INFOFISH

INFOFISH is the leading source of marketing support for fish producers and exporters in the Asia-Pacific - a region which includes some of the largest fishing nations in the world.

Its activities include bringing buyers and sellers together, publication of current and long-term marketing information and operation of technical advisory and specialized services.

In addition to organizing exhibitions, conferences, workshops, seminars and training programs, INFOFISH undertakes consultancies on all aspects of fisheries - pre-harvest, harvest and post-harvest.

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